Good news on two fronts today (CanswerWORTH)

Dee Dee and I have returned from the 4th-year anniversary visit to City of Hope with the test results from the CT, bone-density, and other routine tests reported by our chief oncologist and endocrinologist. The CT was negative (clean) and the bone-density actually showed some improvement, albeit I am still in the osteopenia range due to the chemo and other medications taken during the last seven years. But the most important news is: REMISSION from the lymphoma remains, now approaching 4 years since the relapse in 2009! Answered prayers indeed. August 23 is the 6-year anniversary of my SCT.

On another front: My brother Bob (63) in Jacksonville got the results of his genetic testing as a follow-up for his diagnosis with melanoma. The news is good because they found the presence of the B-RAF gene which means that he is a candidate for the latest and the most successful form of treatment for the disease. That treatment is due to begin soon as he and his wife, Claudia, make their way within the coming week to the Tampa Moffitt Cancer Center, a place in Florida that is much like our City of Hope, actually the closest comprehensive cancer center in proximity to their home. We hope and pray for his full recovery.  ~ Posted on my Facebook Timeline + Flipped to CANswer♥WORTH on FLIPBOARD

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#Future

“This verse, quoted to countless individuals who are struggling with vocation or discerning God’s will, is not written to individuals at all. This passage is written to a whole group of people—an entire nation. For all the grammarians out there, the “you” in Jeremiah 29:11 isn’t singular, it’s plural. And you don’t have to be a Hebrew scholar to realize that “one” versus “many” is a big difference,”  according to Thom Turner, program manager at International Justice Mission. He is a graduate of Rutgers University (MA in English) and Cairn University (BS English Ed., BS Bible), and blogs at THIS LINK.

Turner further adds: “And the verse just before it is perhaps even scarier. For in Jeremiah 29:10, God lays down the specifics on this promise: that He will fulfill it after seventy years are completed for Babylon. In other words, yes, God says, I will redeem you—after 70 years in exile. This is certainly a far cry from our expectation of this verse in what God’s plans to prosper us really mean. He did have a future and a hope for them—but it would look far different than the Israelites ever expected.”

Despite this admonition and prompt to clarity on the now amplified verse, millions of Bible followers still take much solace from the verse for their personal lives while reading into this text the Lord’s hope for a brighter future.  If you are among those who would like to capture that sentiment in a larger than life way, you may wish to visit our AMAZONE LINK.

When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change

ALTACITIES® (http://altacities.com) is the social network moniker for Mike & Dee Dee Foxworth of Corona, California. Our AMAZON location reflects the reading we are doing on our KINDLE devices and apps and other interests during our retirement years. Browse the topics and let us know what you enjoy by returning comments at our blog and website. ALSO ASK US ABOUT OUR PHILANTHROPIC PARTNERSHIPS where charitable partners derive income from purchases made on these pages.                                           © 2013 ALTACITIES ®

 

 

http://altacities.com   }:{   http://browseonpurpose.com   }:{  http://socialcurrentsee.com

Every survivor looks great, no matter the appearance

Social Current See : Following the survivors on the Facebook page Non Hodgkin’s Lymphoma.
Just made a comment on the FB wall of Douglas Mancebo, who is concerned about his physical appearance (the Kojack look) and advised him:

Don’t sweat the appearance of all your friends because they should not sweat yours. In 2007, I showed up at the wedding to give away my youngest daughter. Had a tumor in my left jaw the size of a orange and was bald as a billard ball. But alive and a few months away from an SCT that keeps me alive almost 6 years later. Those who care about you are just happy to see you. Those who don’t like your appearance can hang out somewhere else.

After I came out of isolation following my SCT and sometimes prior, when I saw people I hadn’t seen in awhile they often said, “Great to see you!”  My usual response was, “Great to be seen!”

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New treatments see blood cancer survival rates up

The formula above is not meant as a math trick.  But it does depict some tricky math for cancer survivors like me.

All that I have to say about this search and this topic is that it is good to be counted among the one in four.  That is, according to this source, one in four NHL (non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma) survivors have a chance of surviving for five years.   Count me at 5.8 years since my stem cell transplant and 7 years since the diagnosis of mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), a potent form of NHL.

Reading this article and seeing this illustration of the three bags of stem cells makes for a personal flashback to the August 2007 SCT procedure at City of Hope.

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Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer

Human Embryonic Stem Cells Derived by Somatic Cell Nuclear Transfer }:{ My August 2007 stem cell transplant (SCT) was done with adult cells from an unrelated donor.  While the procedure is fraught with risks, mortality, and morbidity factors for the recipient, an SCT or the BMT (bone marrow) equivalent is virtually harmless to the adult donor.
 }:{  alt@search  }:{  alt@story   }:{ 

Because I was the recipient of life-saving stem cells 5.8 years ago, I am naturally more than a casual observer of the science.  But everyone who seriously follows this story line and these tweets, realizes that society and medicine at large both face certain ethical questions regarding transplants using embryonic cells.  While the adult cells issue is largely resolved, I am not sure that this “breakthrough” cloning of embryonic cells solves the larger ethical issue, but it does bring the science to an important threshold, thanks to the work of:

Shoukhrat Mitalipov is an associate scientist in the Division of Reproductive & Developmental Sciences of ONPRC, Oregon Stem Cell Center and Departments of Obstetrics & Gynecology and Molecular & Medical Genetics, and co-director of the ART/ESC core at the Center. He earned his Ph.D. degree in Developmental & Stem Cell Biology at the Research Center for Medical Genetics in Moscow, Russia. He came to Utah State University in 1995 to conduct his postdoctoral research in stem cell and developmental biology. Dr. Mitalipov moved to the Oregon center in 1998.

In summary, the research by Dr. Mitalipov deals with totipotent and pluripotent stem cells that are important as a unique research tool that allows investigation of the mechanisms regulating early primate development and differentiation. Human stem cells also provide the far-reaching foundation for the field of regenerative medicine and offer hope for the treatment of a wide range of clinical conditions that can be attributed to the loss or malfunction of specific cell types. Translational research in the clinically relevant nonhuman primate model is highly desirable to evaluate the safety, feasibility and efficacy of cell-based therapies. The basic research conducted in the Mitalipov lab provides new insights into the generation, maintenance and developmental potential of primate totipotent and pluripotent stem cells.

and publisher of alt@cities on paper.li for
constant web and mobile communication
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When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change
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#stemcell : the social current see today

5.8.25* : You would expect my interest in this hashtag to be constant since my August 2007 stem cell transplant, but it has been awhile since I updated my “follow” list in this category. So, today, I finished that update on TWITTER with these results.  }:{ Also see CANSWERIST  * 5 years, 8 months, 25 days since my SCT
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Also see : exit Everything ||  HALLMARKS  ||  Our SCT Xperience
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When you change the way you look at things, the things you look at change

#stemcell : the social current see today